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for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
. before the upgrade, greece's rating had fallen to selective default, which meant it failed to pay on one or more of its obligations. now it was pushed upward to b minus. this shows that greece can meet its financial commitments. i spoke to the fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. >> i think was s&p is catching up to is the improved political goodwill in the rest of the euro area towards the greek economy. yesterday, greece got 34 billion euros as a quid pro quo for having implemented a long list of reforms and fiscal austerity. s&p as saying, we expect this money to continue to flow from up euro area. nd we expect thre greek government to continue to implement economic reforms in the future. >> does this upgrade change anything for grece in rea ?ce ter >> the greek exit from the euro area is an extremely unlikely event, precisely for the reason s&p outlined -- that the euro area has politically decided to keep greece in the euro area. this is not something that will make a big difference in the short term, but because it does not reflect a change in the domestic
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. -- like in 2008. it is of
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
the region's financial authorities will monitor greece's bond buying back program. he says the finance ministers will sign off in the next round of loans t greece wn they meet again on december 13th. the ministers also talked about spain. they decided to provide up to nearly $40 billion euros. they're decision came after the bailout fund to sure up its constituti institutions. the nikkei average at 9,434. that's a loss of one-fourth of a percent. the dollar is slightly losing ground. dollar yen changing hands at 82.13 to 17. euro stands at 107.19 to 24. analysts say investors are selling the dollar following the release of u.s. manufacturing data. it was the lowest in almost three and a half years. more investors are showing interest in the weakening yen. taking a look at other markets, south korea's kospi is trading lower. let's take a look at australia. it's trading lower by almost a third of a percent. there's hope for floundering bas bas basic electronics firm sharp. the firm is expected to receive part of the that sum as early as this month. sharp is forecasting a record net loss
the conflict in syria to the new politics of egypt, from protests in greece to the amazing olympics of london, as the year draws to a close, we'll look back at 2012 and some of the event that changed our world. -- event that changed our world -- events that changed our world. >> that was scary, wasn't it? >> that was scary. >> welcome to syria. >> a farmer goes hungry so his children can eat. they only get one soon, so each must wait his turn. -- one spoon, so each must wait his turn. >> for the spiders, the liberation has always been their ultimate goal. -- these fighters, the liberation has always been their ultimate goal. >> week meet members of the country's newest rebel army, known as -- we meet members of the country's newest rebel army, known as m23. this is their main base, about 5 kilometers away. >> some of the most isolated communities and tributaries provide the most surprises. the population of the village is 208. we're reminded that environmental decisions made today can impact the next generation. >> we did find some significant [inaudible] >> ♪ ["gangnam style" playing] ♪
story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
, greece, portugal are likely to stay in recession for the whole year, i would argue there's a high probability that italy will come out of recession towards the end of the second quarter. >> and that seems to be the real concern that is in the market today, whether the political upheaval, even the campaigning by berlusconi could undo some of that progress. >> i think the key point is will the reform programs that have been initiated by the monte government, will they stay intact? i think there's a reasonable chance, they've had a more than reasonable chance that that is the case. yes, it's not surprising, we have the sell off today. it's inest knowledge that as the campaigning builds up, investors will be nervous.. the move by investors back into italian bonds over the next few months, we could see some exits. but i think if we get a sensible election results, and i think we probably will, then the reform program will be intact and the new government will stick to the budget that is going to be passed in the next two weeks. >> maybe a buying opportunity there. i won't quite put the
austerity measures have prolonged. not taken that area out of recession. in greece, you often hear members of this house who say the united states economy is going to be like greece. oh, really? greece is not growing. greece has lost 25% in its economy in the past five years. greece's economy shrunk by 7% this year alone. there's a 20% unemployment rate in greece and even higher for younger people. greece doesn't make anything that the rest of the world wants. the american economy is dynamic. the american economy always needs to be improving with education, scientific research and infrastructure investment. so, a rational system, a rational political system would respond much differently than what is going on here in this congress. we're talking about spending cuts and allowing tax cuts that haven't produced economic growth to be extended. all of the people that are talking about spending did all the spending. they are the debt and deficit creators. if we want to experience economic growth we have to invest in this economy. and it's critically important to the future of this nation. medica
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
-- to save the country from becoming greece, tax rate hikes are part of the solution driven by the president. but he's going to get tax rate hikes. ratey republican colleagues, if we can protect 99% of the american public from a tax hike that is not a tax increase in my books. >> glor: with christmas just two nuys away last minute gift buyers are out. today shopper track said raturday was the busiest day of the holiday season behind black friday. r wever a cut in spending % recast from 3.3% of growth this year to 2.5%. parts of the u.s. will get a white christmas or more. tcheer storm watches have been issued for parts of arkansas and oklahoma. california is already getting wet. carter evans has the forecast. >> reporter: it's been bad enough. cars buried if they could move at all in the midwest. in california's sierra nevada, up to five feet of snow could fall. that's great news for skiers. >> we love the snow. c reporter: not for holiday fliers. >> the only option we have is to drive. >> reporter: the most violent y beher may be yet to come. and the timing couldn't be worse. >> it's going
of a break-up, notably let by a greece exit were too high, higher than keeping greece in. >> and who were some of the past winners? what in your point of view is the most important criteria for picking person of the year? what is this supposed to represent? >> it's an important contribution to innovation. we've had receive jobs, for example, as person of the year. we earlier, five years ago, we had picked shawn claude trichet, the then president of the european central bank because he led the central bank response in 2001. so i think it's someone who has made a decisive, positive contribution to economic policy, public policy and that is probably why we wouldn't choose the north korean lead, who just let up a north korean missile this week. >> are there any regrets over choosing trichet now? >> i don't think so. he played an important role. we think mr. draghi has been somewhat bolder in his approach, notably through the money transactions which are designed to intervene in the bond market to reduce spreads where, in effect, speculators are betting on a break up of the eurozone, which is
stay on the pathway we're currently on we're headed to the nanny state which is france and greece. that concerns me a great deal and the country will not be able to deal with the leader of the free world if we continue on that pathway. >> what would that look like for the average citizen? >> the average citizen more and more their life would be dependent on uncle sam. the difference between america and the rest of the world is our founding fathers placed the highest priority on individual enterprise and individual spirit. if people are willing to say my dependent upon my own willingness to work hard and impact the process we will continue to have that driving force that makes us the strongest country in the world. if we're not careful, we will walk away from it and soon, unfortunately, we'll be like france. >> do you have any sense there is a generational sense on views how the government should serve the public among younger americans than it is among baby boomers and older? >> i'm hopeful we can convince the cross section of the younger generation that their contribution to our
a greece, too extreme, but i would say italy. holy irresponsible for any republican member of the house of representatives to vote for the package that mitch mcconnell is negotiating on their behalf without their leaders present. it is a ridiculous package. it does not work, and it will solve our long-term debt problems. gerri: i never have to guess at what you think. you are always clear isabela and entertaining. thank you for coming out tonight. have a great new year. >> happy new year. gerri: no votes in the house tonight. meanwhile, we go off the cliff tomorrow. it does not applicable be a happy new year. our political panel place the blame game next. ♪ [hip-hop music] ♪ - ♪ what's wrong with the world, mama ♪ ♪ people livin' like they ain't got no mamas ♪ ♪ i think the whole world's addicted to the drama ♪ ♪ only attracted to the things that'll bring the trauma ♪ ♪ where is the love - ma'am. - [gasps] - you forgot your purse. - oh. thank you. thank you very much. gerri: fiscal stiffed. that is of americans feel after congress failed to reach a deal on taxes an
this down. there are solutions to this. this is not europe, this is not greece. there are solutions. it's the politics that mess everything up. >> you're absolutely right. getting back to the issue of tax rates, it looked like we were getting closer. boehner offered to raise rates for those making more than $1 million a year. the rate would increase only on the amount you made over $1 million. president obama, who insists on letting the bush tax cuts expire for earners making more than $250,000, at least that's how he presented it during the campaign. offered to let those taxes rise on those making more than 400,000 a year. we're talking marginal rates, only on income above $400,000. by the way, mark, $370,000 a year is what puts you in the top 1%. all of those levels, 250, 400, a million. what's the breakoff point at which raising rates would substantially hurt the economy. >> i think they're coming to a compromise, the president's 400 k, speaker boehner was a million. my guess is they come to an agreement somewhere around $500,000. if that's the break point in the tax increase, i don'
. there are solutions to this. this is not europe. this is not greece. there are solutions. it's the politics that mess everything up. >> yeah. you're absolutely right. getting back to the issue of tax rates, it looked like we were getting closer. boehner offered to raise mate raitts for those making more than a million dollars a year, and the rate would only increase on the amount of money you earn over a million dollars a year. just raising those rates were a major concession for any republican. president obama, who insists on letting the bush tax cults expire for earns making more than $250,000, or at least that's how he presented it during the campaign, offered to let those taxes rise on those making more than $400,000 a year. we're talking marginal rates then so, that would be only on income above $400,000. by the way, mark, $370,000 a year is what puts you into the top 1% here. you're an economist. all those income levels, 250, 400, a million, flying around for raising rates, what in your opinion is the breakoff point at which raising rates would substantially hurt the economy? >> well, i mean, i
& poor's upgraded greeces bond rating, europe found a way to muddle through. and the world didn't end on december 21st. >> woodruff: compactedly. which was a lot of people were take very seriously. >> but the mayans maybe not terrific forecasters. >> woodruff: looking back at 2012, michael kberb beschloss, richard norton smith, thank you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and again the major developments of this day, >> suarez: again, the major developments of the day, bargaining on a fiscal cliff deal continued, but house republican leaders opted not to vote on anything tonight. that meant the government will >> the house adjourned for tomorrow so the government is guaranteed to go over the fiscal cliff, at least for the moment. and doctors at a new york hospital announced secretary of state hillary clinton has a blood clot between the school and brain. but they said she's making excellent progress. we're capturing new year's eve celebrations around the world and you can be a part of kwame holman has the details. >> holman: we're tracking instagram with the hashtag "nye" to see how
with stories of joy, sadness, greece, elation, and astonishment. >> let us take a look back at some of the top stores from 2012. >> (cheers and applause) thank you so much. >> we want to be free. >> ♪ an italian cruise ship capsize. >> nearly 23% and unemployment. >> viral socially is sites. >> my name is sandra flux. >> the largest ipo in tech history. >> want article has the entire country talking. >> the president says he now believes that same-sex marriage should be legal. >> we now know the name of a suspect slain in the movie theater shooting. >> police now tells the in in people have been shot in front of the empire state building. >> basalt. >> that's all. >> jerry sandusky was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years in prison. >> to paternal is gone. >> (cheers and applause) the british people are going gaga . >> someone's old photographs of prince harry naked during a strip on billiards game. but the wrong? why now? >> flooding shut up? >>--what do you mean shut up? >> christopher stevens and three other embassy staff are dead. >> all the effects of hurricane sandy. >> said he has carve
way was didn't happen, at the end of the year standard & poor's upgraded greeces bond rating europe found a way to muddle through. and the world didn't end on december 21st. >> woodruff: compactedly. which was a lot of people were take very seriously. >> but the mayans maybe not terrific forecasters. >> woodruff: looking back at 2012, michael kberb beschloss richard norton smith, thank you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and again the major developments of this day >> suarez: again, the major developments of the day, bargaining on a fiscal cliff deal continued, but house republican leaders opted not to vote on anything tonight. that meant the government will >> the house adjourned for tomorrow so the government is guaranteed to go over the fiscal cliff, at least for the moment. and doctors at a new york hospital announced secretary of state hillary clinton has a blood clot between the school and brain. but they said she's making excellent progress. we're capturing new year's eve celebrations around the world and you can be a part of kwame holman has the details. >> holman: we'r
. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval
say greece? >> host: what does it mean for the pentagon? >> guest: any program, how did you continue? greece used to be one of the only three great non-u.s. countries, spending about 2% of gdp on national security. we were spending fortified at the time. we are under four. responding to something. they are now below that and having even further south because they simply can't afford it. >> host: new jersey, democratic collar. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. first of all, i am a retired army colonel, executive and also an author. adelle lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about social security and medicare, the entitlements and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. no part today in a problem. a problems exist for three principal reasons. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund. second, we had a huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 where people stop paying taxes and start drawing welfare. number three, we have the tax cuts, both the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which
at the pace it has been growing. we do have an advantage that greece does not have. we print the world's money. we cannot expect the dollar will be keen to tomorrow. -- forever. if the europeans can manage their deficit and we cannot, the world will switch to euros. there is a tweet here -- guest: the cbo is supposed to be a political, but it cannot be too alarmist. if we go over the cliff, we are looking on january 1, some of this is already milton. about $600 million -- $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases. that is about 4% of gdp. that is an enormous negative stimulus. a detraction from demand. that would surely be a deep recession. the cbo relies on simulation models that did not take into consideration investor sentiment, the reaction of consumers, and so forth that they wholly lose confidence in their government. if we go over the cliff and stay there, people will start to conclude that washington cannot manage its affairs. all bets are off on economic modeling. it is impossible to say what happened that other than it would be very negative. host: one piece that you actually d
romney kept saying this country could be on the road to be more like greece if we did not get our arms around it. the unemployment rate remains high. are you optimistic in the short term about our country's future. >> it is hard to be. i tried to be. if we can get this resolved, this fiscal cliff situation, and have a pathway to seeing the deficit be reduced, cannot do it overnight, if we can see there is a path, a trajectory of slowing down the growth of spending to the point you can see the deficit will ultimately go away over a reasonable time, people will start investing again, hiring again, and i spoke to a business group yesterday and asked if they would hire just because they get a tax credit for hiring people. they said no. if you see the deficit will go away and there is hope we are on the right path to fiscal sanity, will you then hired? yes. we will have markets for our products and services and then we will need more people. we are stuck right now because all we have done for a year and a half was kick the can down the road. i voted against the act a year- and-a-half ago be
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
to greece. it was their number one vessel for a long, long time until about 1991 when the greek government decided they no longer needed the vessel. within a very short time the destroyer escort service association raised nearly $300,000 to have it towed back to america. it was housed for a short time at the intrepid air c space museum in new york city. when they no longer had room for them to search for a new home. mayor jennings felt this would be a wonderful attraction on the waterfront, he was trying to revitalize the time. and now it's the only destroy air as core still afloat and america in its original world war ii configuration. this is the kind of thing that allows people to see what it was like back then, why there was world war ii and what happened and how valuable the sailors were who served aboard these vessels. it is a remarkable testimony, i think, to a degree of -- bravery of the men back in those days. >> and no more from albany, new york, with the help of time warner cable we take a look at one of the original talking book and braille libraries. >> in new york state libra
this morning. i had no idea -- i had no idea it was an immigrant company. >> you thought it was from greece. [laughter] >> exactly, you know. i had no idea. these google -- all of these companies which maybe it needs to be a marketing campaign. i don't know. but something i think should be done to change the image of immigrants and make it more positive, and i think that will facilitate everything we're talking about today. so how do you guys think we can maybe change that image of immigrants and make it more positive and not make everybody, when they think of immigrants think of border wars on history channel. >> well, at different times and places, immigrants have been viewed more or less favorably in the united states. this is a nation of immigrants. but when immigration was largely cut off during the 1920's, a lot of americans became somewhat estranged from the immigrant roots of their forebearers. and lost a sense that we were a nation of immigrants. but in some parts of the country today you see the enormous economic vitality it comes with a really diverse and active population that a
at the currency and isolation. >> steven, stay there. selling 1.3 billion euros in three-month t-bills for greece. the bid to cover ratio, 1.73%. this allocation did include a 30% noncompetitive tranche. in other central bank news, it's been quite a busy day on that front. the central bank says use the repo rate holing at this level in the coming year warning the recovery is taking its toll on the economy. >>> and in australia, the rba eps's decision to lower rates appears to find a close one. central banks included keeping the rates on hold. still, policymakers were more concerned by more than expected slowdown in mining and investment. and japan's prime minister elect has told the country's central bank to consider adopt ago 2% inflation target. shinzo abe made the claim today. the bank is expected to cut borrowing costs at its rate setting meeting this week. steven, in light of all of this news, kind of goes back to the point that we were just making, that are a lot of central banks trying to use interest rates effectively as a way to depress the value of their currency even though we're seein
can be a bit less worried about greece next year than we can be this year, for example, as well as in spain the government is considering a variety of reform efforts. indeed, despite the exchange in governments we had this year, it's the french deposit. when we look at it in aggregate, i think the tailwinds are starting to overcome the headwinds. the headwinds are still going to be there. the fiscal one is very important. there are still going to be risks on the european side. there's still the geopolitics which, of course, we can't ignore here. but in aggregate, i think those tailwinds are starting to get more traction and that's particularly becoming true in the u.s. housing market. >> what's interesting to that point is that we're coming to a year where even some of those concern are going away. central banks are starting to get extraordinarily accommodative. i wonder if their measures haven't been too back end loaded. certainly when you look at japan, it has pursued cycles earlier and had more impact. what about the sense ta whether it's the fed, whether it's the bank of jap
seven early movers for you, high profits, but less money coming in in the packaging company, greece it's called. what's with the stock? it's up about 4%. the rare earth mining company molycorp ousted its chief executive officer. it's down a little. profits disappointing seismic equipment maker geospace, down and dupont buying back a billion dollars worth of its stock and it's up just a little. health insurer aetna expects higher profits next year, it's up. and microsoft has wrapped up production of its new surface tablet and it, too, moving higher in the early going, i own some microsoft stock. netflix says it needs many more subscribers to be profitable. nonetheless it's up. dow industrials are up 37. and news from berkshire hathaway coming in and it's-- okay, they've bought back 9200 of their class a shares from the estate of one of their shareholders. so they bought back 9200 shares there, the class a stock. that was the news, part of the news on which the halting of berkshire hathaway was based. okay? when they start trading again, nell pretty soon, we'll get a quote for you on tha
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
the united states in the 1930's and is characterized greece today. the program of 375 billion pounds is 0.25 of an annual nominal gdp flow. a lot of money. bront money is now expanding at over 5% and we will see the impact of that on demand later in 2013. the second action the bank has taken to provide a breathing space before these broad macroeconomic factors feedthrough is to introduce what we call a funding for lending scheme. a special scheme started on the first of august under which the bank of england, with the garden -- guarantee of the governor because this is a cause i-fiscal action, would provide four-year financing for banks to enable them to increase lending to the real economy or at the least, to contract lending to the real economy by less than they would otherwise have done. we will lend to banks according to how much they are expanding their own net lending to the real economy and the more they expand their net lending, the lower the interest rate which will charge on loans to them. there is a powerful financial incentive built into this funding for lending scheme to pers
greece faced multi-year recession and slowdown, unemployment at over 25%, youth unemployment over 50%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in bos
this yesterday that greece has priced the debt buyback where it has. it will be more generous and next week they're likely to get their money from the rest of the european union. taking some of those concerns back out of the market so, again, today the spanish bond market rallying and, therefore, the yield forming. still above 5% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of their assets is gaining ground. other financials around europe, the likes of kbc, bank of ireland, a lot of questions to the degree the irish can get better terms for their bailout or deal as a result of what the greeks have been given. there is -- and carl mentioned this, one area of concern today, and that's the finance minister's meeting where the frie french and the germans seem at odds over how they're going to get banking union, the germans are saying it cannot -- the individual banks cannot all be controlled by the ecb,
kind of fiscal order. if not, we will become greece in 20 years. guest: that is a great point to bring up. leaders on both sides of the aisle on capitol hill have made the point that this is not a democratic or republican issue. there is waste to be curbed. what i am hearing from republicans like jon kyl is that you have to make sure america is still able to make its commitments on the world stage. we spoke with a lot of defense- heavy representative, folks from the house armed services committee. they can see that there are cuts to be made. it is just about doing it in a responsible manner rather than across the board cuts, which is less discriminatory than most defense advocates would like. host: we have earl in street louis on our line for democrats. go ahead, - st. louis on our line for democrats. caller: i was just wondering about the defense industrial complex that president eisenhower made the comment about. the defense contract workers are union workers. i do not hear the republicans hollering about that. i am is retired veteran. i think it is time we cut back on defense progra
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